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iCS’ NEWSLETTER
July 2018
What did we learn from the truck drivers’ strike?

Publication in tribute to the political trajectory of Marielle Franco

What can Private Social Investment do to confront climate change?

Pact for Democracy is launched with the presence of organizations and political parties

Movements attempt to strengthen the participation of women in politics

More bicycles, less sickness, and more economy

Urban mobility and intelligent cities in focus

Pedestrians and bicycles help the future of low carbon and the rise in the economy

Comprehensive panorama of the cycle path network in the Brazilian capitals

The Study portrays the adaptation capability of Brazilian cities to climate change

Carbon pricing was highlighted at the fourth meeting in the series Sustainable Future Dialogues

Brazil spends an amount equivalent to 1% of its GDP on subsidies for fossil fuels

Lesson learned with the truck drivers’ strike in Brazil

Complete document on thermoelectricity in the electrical sector is released


WHAT'S HAPPPENING IN BRAZIL OPINION
What did we learn from the truck drivers’ strike?

Photo: Ana Rezende

After the truck drivers’ strike, would it be rational to talk about a tax on carbon in Brazil? Based on this question, the Instituto Escolhas performed an analysis of the cargo transport system in the country to understand what lessons could be learned – taking into account the movement that paralyzed the Brazilian economy for almost two weeks.

The episode is an invitation to reflect on the dependence of the country on trucks and diesel fuel and their impact on climate change. The challenge provides a warning to leaders about how we can “escape” from the simple solution – the truck and diesel – and invest in other sources of energy and modals that expand the options of how goods arrive at our homes.

In 2015, the Instituto Escolhas published the study “ Economic and Social Impacts of the Carbon Tax in Brazil ”. It pointed out that a tax on emissions from the burning of fossil fuels would produce a demand for renewable sources of energy. The survey also simulated that a downturn in the economy caused by the implementation of a new tax on emissions would be easily compensated by a simplification of other taxes, such as PIS/Cofins. The main results indicate that this mechanism would produce an increase in GDP of 0.47%, producing 532,000 jobs and an increase of R$ 5.2 billion in tax revenues.

The strike indicated that there are important lessons to be observed when planning a tax on emissions, among them the fact that a charge on diesel must be treated with care. The strategic importance of road transport in the national economy is clear.

We are aware that alternatives such as railways or the electrification of trucks require significant and long-term investment. This will only happen if we stop subsidizing fossil fuels and start to invest seriously in the construction of a low carbon economy.

Humanity needs to create limits for greenhouse gas emissions and the government subsidy for the consumption of diesel is far too expensive for Brazilian society and the climate.

Sergio Leitão
Director of the Instituto Escolhas

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CLIMATE POLICY AND OUTREACH
Publication in tribute to the political trajectory of Marielle Franco

Photo: Study E+P Latin America

The Update Institute has released an urgent publication: Emergence + Politics: Latin America. In a series of 250 interviews, the study presents references “capable of rescuing the confidence in politics, this powerful tool of transformation” in the Latin American continent, where nine elections will define the next steps in the region in 2018. It is a continuation of the mapping performed by Update in 2016 that disclosed an ecosystem of emerging political practices. The work is a tribute to the trajectory of Marielle Franco, the councilor from Rio de Janeiro who was brutally assassinated on March 14, this year. She was one of the interviewees in the survey.

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What can Private Social Investment do to confront climate change?

The project “O que o Investimento Social Privado pode fazer por” by GIFE (Grupo de Institutos Fundações e Empresas) has arrived at the issue of climate change. By recognizing the importance and the impact of the topic on daily life and on the development model, it seeks to reflect on the contributions from the field for this new agenda in Brazil. In an exclusive interview to the website of the organization, Carlos Nobre, one of the most renowned climatologists in the country and president of the Board of Directors of the Brazilian Panel, suggests that Private Social Investment supports only projects that pursue the logic of the efficient and sustainable use of the natural resources, not only in the climate dimension but also in others. According to him, the training of political, business, trade union and civil society leaders with the understanding of the risks of climate change and the possibilities of mitigation and adaptation is also fundamental.

From the same perspective, RedeGIFE also interviewed Alice Amorim, the coordinator of the Climate and Engagement Policy portfolio of iCS. According to Alice, much of the required investment involves the production of a type of knowledge that neither the public sector, due to regulatory issues, nor the private sector, because of the demand to produce profits, can perform. An example is the demand for the development of a Gender and Climate Change Action Plan, with the impact of the climate policies on women, within the ambit of the Paris Agreement. It concerns a type of study designed to resolve issues of public interest and for which there is no better supporter than the private social investor.

On YouTube , there is a series of themed videos on the GIFE channel entitled “What can Private Social Investment do for...” with interviews of Carlos Rittl (Observatório do Clima), Paula Galeano (Fundação Tide Setubal), Ivan Marques (Instituto Sou da Paz), Rodrigo Brito (Instituto Coca-Cola) and Ana Toni (iCS), among others.

 

Photo: CUT

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Pact for Democracy is launched with the presence of organizations and political parties

The Pact for Democracy , an initiative of more than 60 organizations and movements from civil society – including iCS, Instituto Ethos, Igarapé, Update, Alana, and Engajamundo, among others -, was launched in June in São Paulo. Political parties with different ideologies intend to “reaffirm the dialogue, the tolerance and the complete rejection of all forms of discrimination and violence in political action; to produce clean and diverse elections with ample participation in October, by rebuilding the bases of trust and legitimacy in the political environment”, and to carry out a broad political reform after the elections with the “reaffirmation of the construction of the country that we need”.

Photo: Alicia Peres

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Movements attempt to strengthen the participation of women in politics

Promo: Alziras

In 2016, after the last municipal elections, one number stood out among so many new mayors and councilors: only 11.8% of the municipalities were run by women, which demonstrates a significant inequality between genders. This observation also applies to the Senate, the Congress, state governments, and the Federal Supreme Court. In another electoral year, movements are attempting to change this situation . For example, there is the platform The Candidate which intends to create a support network for women leaders with training and mentoring, and the Instituto Alziras , which seeks to strengthen the mandates of the mayors elected in 2016. Courses, forums, debates, and researches are on offer to enable these proposals.

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TRANSPORT
More bicycles, less sickness, and more economy

Photo: Felipe Baenninger/Projeto Transite

The increased use of bicycles is directly related to health and the economy of resources. This is one of the main conclusion of the recent study by the Centro Brasileiro de Análise e Planejamento (Cebrap) [the Brazilian Center of Analysis and Planning]. It calculated that the Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS) [the Brazilian Universal Healthcare Program], of São Paulo, would reduce its costs by up to R$ 34.4 million per year if this means of transport was used to the maximum in the state capital. This would be as a result of the reduction in medical admissions for circulatory problems and diabetes. This information matches the research by Paulo Saldiva, from the Instituto de Estudos Avançados (IEA/USP) [the Institute of Advanced Studies]: the pollution in SP reduced by one half during the truck drivers’ strike.

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Urban mobility and intelligent cities in focus

Photo: Guilherme Leporace|Museu do Amanhã

How to improve urban mobility in large urban centers , and what is the relationship of this with the future of intelligent cities? This topic was the starting point of the fourth meeting of Plataforma 2018: O Brasil do Amanhã [Platform 2018: The Brazil of Tomorrow], curated by Walter Figueiredo de Simoni, from iCS, and a table formed by Cláudio Frischtak (InterB), Washington Fajardo (WAU Agência Urbana), Clarisse Linke (ITDP Brasil) and Henrique Silveira (Casa Fluminense), with mediation by the journalist Raquel Novaes, from GloboNews. The current scenario and the proposals for the development of public policies to reduce the dependence in relation to the single modal model and fossil fuels were some of the topics debated.

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Pedestrians and bicycles help the future of low carbon and the rise in the economy

Photo: Bicicleta nos Planos

Over half of the global population lives in urban areas. In Brazil, according to data from the IBGE, this number is even greater: 85%. The direct consequence is the consumption in cities of 60% of the global energy and the responsibility for 70% of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GGE). With this pretext, the Bicycle in the Plans campaign, with authorship by the Coalition for Climate and Active Mobility and Walter Figueiredo de Simoni (iCS), launched its fifth infographic to illustrate that the reduction in emissions lies in the combination between low carbon technologies, changes in the mode of transport and policies of densification and the use of land. According to data from the ITDP, “a focus on cycle path policies would reduce transport emissions by 11% up to 2050”. Check out the complete infographic!

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Comprehensive panorama of the cycle path network in the Brazilian capitals

Com o objetivo de mapear e monetizar o complexo econômico da bicicleta, o estudo “A Economia da Bicicleta”, realizado pela Aliança Bike e Laboratório de Mobilidade Sustentável da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (LABMOB/UFRJ), buscou definir um conjunto de indicadores representativo dessa economia no país, a partir do desenvolvimento de um arcabouço metodológico. Para tanto, cinco eixos foram analisados: cadeia produtiva, políticas públicas, transporte, atividade e afins e benefícios para o clima, energia e saúde. Veja!

Photo: A Economia da Bicicleta no Brasil

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The Study portrays the adaptation capability of Brazilian cities to climate change

The study “ Adaptation to Climate Change ”, developed by ITDP Brasil at the request of the Ministry of Cities between 2015 and 2016, had an abbreviated version published in June 2018. It proposed responding to questions such as: what is the degree of vulnerability of Brazilian cities to extreme events, such as flooding, landslides, and heatwaves? What measures do our cities need to take to adapt to these changes? What policies and actions can be efficient to impede – or at least reduce – future damage? And what are, actually, the possible scenarios for the climate in the different areas of Brazil? There is good news: Brazil has the opportunities to build good adaptation strategies. All we need to do is create the bases and the political will.

Divulgação: A Economia da Bicicleta no Brasil

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LOW CARBON ECONOMY
Carbon pricing was highlighted at the fourth meeting in the series Sustainable Future Dialogues

The benefits of a carbon market for Brazil and for the world were debated by Brazilian and foreign specialists during the International Meeting on Carbon Pricing, held by the Conselho Empresarial Brasileiro para o Desenvolvimento Sustentável (CEBDS) [the Brazilian Council for Sustainable Development], in partnership with the German Embassy in Brasília and the iCS as part of the Sustainable Future Dialogues platform. According to Marina Grossi, president of the CEBDS, the creation of a carbon market in Brazil is fundamental in order for the country to achieve the targets of the Paris Agreement in the short available time period – up to 2030. A proposal from the business sector along these lines will be delivered to the Finance Minister, Eduardo Guardia, entitled “Carbon Pricing in Industry: A Strategic Initiative”. However, the national difficulty resides in the insufficient governance on climate change .

With the oldest and largest carbon market in the world, the European Union has been working on regulation for approximately 20 years and it has already achieved the target to cut emissions by 20% up to 2020 – based on the year 1990. Better than this, claimed Ismo Ulvila, the director-general for the European Commission Climate Action, is that the economy has not suffered. In fact, what happened was the opposite: it grew 54%.

Nowadays, 45 national and 25 sub-national governments have a carbon market. “If we want one, we need to look at the subsidies for fossil fuels”, explained Ana Toni, who emphasized the fact that only three Latin American countries have carbon pricing. Watch the recording of the meeting here!

Photo: A Economia da Bicicleta no Brasil

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Brazil spends an amount equivalent to 1% of its GDP on subsidies for fossil fuels

Photo: Clauzemberg Jardim

Annually, between 2013 and 2017, Brazil spent on average R$ 68.6 billion in subsidies for fossil fuels, as tax breaks and direct costs. The amount is equivalent to 1% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the country or more than two Bolsa Família [Family Allowance] programs. The conclusion is from the study “Subsidies for fossil fuels in Brazil: knowing, evaluating and reforming”, by the Instituto de Estudos Socioeconômicos (Inesc) [the Institute of Social and Economic Studies], which considered all the amounts that the government spent or did not collect in order to benefit the producers of oil, natural gas and coal – or the end consumer of gasoline, diesel oil and domestic gas.

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Lesson learned with the truck drivers’ strike in Brazil

Photo: Instituto Escolhas

The truck drivers’ strike, which took hold of Brazil in May, had more profound effects than the paralysis of the country: the need to reflect on our national dependence on the model of fossil fuels and roads, and its impacts on climate change. In the first publication of the series Policy Brief , the Instituto Escolhas explains the fuse of the crisis, the prominence of the roads, and the importance of placing transitional strategies into practice for a sustainable model – the tax on carbon is part of the effort to guarantee that the price of continuing to produce emissions is high enough to make the low carbon economy viable.

Gustavo Pinheiro, from the iCS, also spoke about carbon pricing in the article published in the Folha de S. Paulo . For him, while the rest of the world slowly plods forward towards pricing pollution, Brazil is going backwards. Among the examples that justify this statement, he mentions the elimination of the tax rate of the Contribuição de Intervenção do Domínio Econômico (CIDE) [the Contribution of Intervention in the Economic Domain] for diesel oil, agreed between the government and the truck drivers during the strike, and also Law 13586, sanctioned in December 2017, which extended the subsidies to the oil and gas industries.

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ENERGY
Complete document on thermoelectricity in the electrical sector is released

Photo: Study

A complete document about the meeting “Thermoelectricity in the new context of the electrical sector: the importance of the evaluation of environmental impacts” was released by the IEMA with guidelines from the organization resulting from the discussions held at the meeting on April 25 and 26. This was attended by government agents from the electrical sector and from the socio-environmental area, academics and representatives from civil society. If, on the one hand, the debates evidenced the tendency to increase the importance of the thermoelectric production in the Brazilian network, as well as the growing deterioration of the socio-environmental conflicts associated with atmospheric pollution and the availability of water, on the other hand the expression of interest and disposition for dialogue and the integrated search for solutions was recurring. Conclusion: there are viable paths, both in terms of management and control technology. Read the whole study!

Photo: Study

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Grants Approved in June
Grant Amount
R$320.000,00
Grant Period
12 months
Portfolio
Energy

Instituto Centro de Vida

Purpose of Grant: To strengthen a network of indigenous communities at the Juruena and Teles Pires basins, to monitor the forthcoming impacts from hydropower dams (already built and planned) over the communities. This grant will enhance indigenous people’s ability to actively participate in the debate around energy in Brazil.

Grant Amount
R$25.000,00
Grant Period
6 months
Portfolio
Climate Policy and Outreach

Instituto Alziras

Purpose of Grant: To develop a qualitative research on the profile of the Brazilian female mayors elected in 2016, identifying their political and personal trajectories, political ambitions and challenges on the ground. The research also aims to map potential climate champions among the female mayors, assessing their knowledge and engagement on climate and SDGs discussions.

Grant Amount
R$50.000,00
Grant Period
9 months
Portfolio
Climate Policy and Outreach

BRICS Policy Center

Purpose of Grant: To establish a working group with researchers from the BRICS Policy Center (BPC) and the Institute for Advanced Studies in Sustainability (IASS) to analyze the global polycentric governance, seeking to understand the role of multiple stakeholders in this governance, focusing on the private sector, as well as the verification of how these processes influence the decision-making process.

Grant Amount
R$50.000,00
Grant Period
6 months
Portfolio
Climate Policy and Outreach

Quebrando o Tabu

Purpose of Grant: To implement Quebrando o Tabu’s content strategy for the 2018 elections through the production and broadcasting of original content to: decrease political polarization; prevent personification of ideas and idealization of candidates; promote dialogue; and bring human rights and climate change to the center of the political debate. The content will be published in Quebrando o Tabu's digital platforms: Facebook (8.9 million followers), Instagram (57 thousand),Twitter (85 thousand).

Grant Amount
R$ 210.000,00
Grant Period
12 months
Portfolio
Energy

Instituto Socioambiental

Purpose of Grant: To assess the potential of energy efficiency and new renewable energies in the state of Roraima and to support the federal and state governments actions towards energy efficiency, as a means to decrease the use of diesel oil in power generation, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the cost of electricity.

Grant Amount
R$80.000,00
Grant Period
6 months
Portfolio
Climate Policy and Outreach

Mandacaru Design Gráfico Ltda

Purpose of Grant: To support the Brazilian version of What Design Can Do for Climate Change (WDCD) with the objective to once again to engage the design community on the issues of climate change and to give visibility to design solutions to the climate challenge. WDCD will support four regional workshops to engage designers in the preparation of the final event and collaborate with the end of year annual event.

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